We must end the drug war now

Until #Black Lives Matter Addresses the Elephant in the Living Room, Not Much Will Change — The Free Thought Project

Matt Agorist

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While the Black Lives Matter movement proposes very radical shifts in law enforcement that would show some improvement, they are silent on one of the most effective solutions.

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If you honestly believe that black lives matter, it is your duty to call for an end to the drug war. Ending the drug war would have profound effects on police interactions in black communities.

No longer would cops be able to launch fishing expeditions in an attempt to catch black people with a substance deemed illegal by the state. This would drastically reduce the amount of police interactions as a whole. What’s more, it would decrease crime by eliminating the monopoly on drug sales held by organized criminal gangs. It would defund the gangs and remove much of the incentive to wage violence in their community.

To understand why this would have such a drastic effect, you have to realize that when the government makes certain substances illegal, it does not remove the demand. Instead, the state creates crime by pushing the sale and control of these substances into the illegal black markets — usually monopolized by gang members in poor communities. All the while, demand remains constant.

We can look at the prohibition of alcohol and the subsequent mafia crime wave that ensued as a result as an example. As TFTP has reported frequently, the year 1930, at the peak of prohibition, happened to be the deadliest year for police in American history. 300 police officers were killed, and innumerable poor people slaughtered as the state cracked down on drinkers.

Outlawing substances does not work.

Criminal gangs form to protect sales territory and supply lines. They then monopolize the control of the constant demand. Their entire operation is dependent upon police arresting people for drugs because this grants them a monopoly on their sale. A horrifying side effect of these criminal gangs is the violence that spills over into the community through trying to maintain said monopolies.

The illegality of drug possession and use is what keeps the low-level users and dealers in and out of the court systems, and most of these people are poor black men. As Dr. Paul pointed out, black people are more likely to receive a harsher punishment for the same drug crime as a white person.

This revolving door of creating and processing criminals fosters the phenomenon known as Recidivism which is the tendency of those who are processed into the system and the likelihood of future criminal behavior.

The War on Drugs takes good people and turns them into criminals every single minute of every single day. The system is set up in such a way that it fans the flames of violent crime by essentially building a factory that turns out violent criminals.

The system knows this too!

When drugs are legalized, gang violence drops — drastically. Not only does it have a huge effect on the localized gangs in America, but the legalization of drugs is crippling to the violent foreign drug cartels too. 

Until Americans educate themselves on the cause of this violence, uninformed and corrupt lawmakers will continue to focus on controlling the symptoms. 

We will see more senseless killings and more innocent lives stripped of opportunity by getting entangled in the system.

Shout it from the rooftops, from the streets, from any pulpit you can find, “Black Lives Matter!” Shout it out loud, Black lives do matter!

But until the root cause of the police state is defined and removed, all that shouting will keep falling on deaf ears. We must end the drug war now.

via Until #Black Lives Matter Addresses the Elephant in the Living Room, Not Much Will Change — The Free Thought Project

4 comments

  1. While I agree that the drug war must ebd… my daughter died because of an illigal drug, she was 25 at the time.

  2. While I understand this “plight” of Black Lives Matter…

    The truth of the matter is:
    ALL Lives Matter.

    1. the fact that you feel the need to say that suggests you dont understand. ALL lives do matter, INCLUDING black lives.

      1. Ummm…
        Yeah– I did say that

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